News Archive

  • (Reuters Health) - - As a growing number of people live decades after a cancer diagnosis, doctors and scientists are developing treatment guidelines for survivors. But a U.S. report suggests more work is needed to improve the consistency and quality of survivorship care. It's been more than a decade since the...
  • (Reuters Health) - In men with localized prostate cancer discovered because they had symptoms or noticed during a work-up for another medical problem, radical prostate surgery leads to an average of three extra years of life compared to a "watchful waiting" approach, researchers say. The benefit of surgery was most...
  • New, less toxic cancer treatments are emerging, but don’t expect chemo to disappear anytime soon. Immunotherapy is one type of new cancer treatment that could someday make chemotherapy a thing of the past.  When Mary Olsen received a diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the most common type of leukemia in adults...
  • “Cancer” is a powerful word that evokes strong feelings. It’s a word associated with a lot of fear. It shouldn’t. According to oncologist Michael McNamara, MD, many patients come with preconceived notions about cancer that are inaccurate — and often scarier than the reality.   Myth 1: Cancer is always fatal. Most...
  • Experts say such care should be expanded to include people who aren’t yet in hospice. Palliative care helps relieve stress, anxiety, and depression in cancer patients. Getty Images Outpatient palliative care can improve the quality of life for people with advanced cancer. It can also improve length of life, according...
  • FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Younger breast cancer patients who have one or both breasts removed have lower levels of satisfaction and well-being than those who have breast-conserving surgery, a new study finds. The study included 560 women diagnosed with breast cancer by age 40. Of those, 28 percent had...
  • Q: Are hospice and palliative care the same thing? A: People often confuse palliative care with hospice. Both types of care ease the suffering severe illness can bring — pain, troublesome symptoms, depression and more. The difference is in their timing. You can begin palliative care at any time. It is usually given in...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters) - When we were told our son had a potentially life-threatening brain tumor, our family was lucky to have world-class doctors and hospitals close to home and health insurance that covered nearly all his medical expenses and prescription drug costs. These resources helped us make a difficult decision...
  • FRIDAY, Dec. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- An educational intervention can improve patients' ability to self-manage their chronic diseases, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Alexis M. Stoner, M.P.H., Ph.D., from Edward Via College of Osteopathic...
  • Fake health news can do real harm. Here’s how to spot the difference between false stories and verified information. The spread of false medical information and news can create barriers between people and better healthcare.  Sleeping with raw, sliced onions in your socks can release toxins from your body. Two handfuls...
  • Relief from medical debt doesn't top the typical holiday wish list. But help with unexpected medical bills could be a welcome gift for millions of Americans. Four in 10 U.S. adults received a surprisingly high medical invoice within the last year, according to a September survey from the nonprofit Kaiser Family...
  • THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise before and after a cancer diagnosis significantly improves odds of survival, a new study finds. Among more than 5,800 U.S. patients with a range of early- to late-stage cancers, those who exercised three or four times a week before and after their diagnosis...
  • If your friend, colleague, partner or family member has completed cancer treatment, you probably feel relieved that their treatment is over and was successful. And you probably imagine they’re feeling relieved, too. But cancer is an emotional roller coaster – and it doesn’t come to a screeching halt once treatment...
  • If scrolling through our newsfeeds and swiping right were Olympic sports, we’d definitely take home a medal. But while we may only be working out our thumbs, that’s not to say our phones can’t help us lead healthier, happier lives—we just need to know the right apps to download. Before you fall down the rabbit hole...
  • About one-third of GoFundMe campaigns are medical fundraisers. A new study in The Lancet, a prestigious medical journal, found that at least 13,600 people have donated to GoFundMe campaigns raising money for unproven cancer treatments. Jeremy Snyder, one of the study's authors, told Business Insider that crowdfunding...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Cooling the scalp may help prevent taxane-induced alopecia, whereas frozen gloves and socks may prevent nail and cutaneous side effects of the drugs, researchers say. "I absolutely recommend these cooling modalities," Dr. Adam Friedman of George Washington University School of Medicine and...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Thin or moderate application of a topical agent before radiation therapy is unlikely to affect the skin dose, although a thick amount should be avoided, researchers say. "Radiation dermatitis is common and often treated with topical therapy," Dr. Brian Baumann of Washington University in St...
  • Returning to regular life at home after lung cancer surgery can be daunting. Hopefully you’ll have close friends or family members around to help you adjust. But still, you’re not feeling your best, and leaving the hospital is leaving the comfort and security of having nurses and doctors around to check on you...
  • At first glance, the idea of stopping cancer treatment might seem strange. Why wouldn’t you want doctors to use every tool at their disposal to beat this deadly disease? But decisions about cancer treatment aren’t always that simple — or easy, says psychosocial oncologist Joel Marcus, PsyD. Here are some things to...
  • Medical professionals are ramping up programs to help cancer survivors deal with the emotional, physical, and financial aftermath. There are now more than 15 million cancer survivors in the United States.  The number of cancer survivors is growing. And they’re living longer. While advances in diagnosis and treatment...