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  • WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A magnetic system for guiding lymph node biopsies in patients with breast cancer undergoing mastectomy has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Sentimag System uses magnetic detection during a sentinel lymph node biopsy to identify specific lymph...
  • Overview Cancer treatment is the use of surgery, radiation, medications and other therapies to cure a cancer, shrink a cancer or stop the progression of a cancer. Many cancer treatments exist. Depending on your particular situation, you may receive one treatment or you may receive a combination of treatments.   Why...
  • Overview Male breast cancer is a rare cancer that forms in the breast tissue of men. Though breast cancer is most commonly thought of as a disease that affects women, breast cancer does occur in men. Male breast cancer is most common in older men, though it can occur at any age. Men diagnosed with male breast cancer...
  • (HealthDay News) -- If you are diagnosed with breast cancer, you should prepare a list of detailed questions to ask your doctor. The American Cancer Society suggests that you inquire about: Exactly what type of breast cancer do you have? How big is the cancer? Has the cancer spread to my lymph nodes or elsewhere? What...
  • WEDNESDAY, March 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many women with early-stage breast cancer with indications for formal genetic risk evaluation do not receive formal counseling, according to a study published online March 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Steven J. Katz, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of Michigan...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Some women diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy can undergo chemotherapy with little risk to their unborn children, according to findings from the International Network on Cancer, Infertility and Pregnancy (INCIP) registry. "Cancer treatment during pregnancy is an option,” Dr. Frederic...
  • Overview Breast cancer surgery is a key component of breast cancer treatment that involves removing the cancer with an operation. Breast cancer surgery may be used alone or in combination with other treatments, such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy, targeted therapy and radiation therapy. For people with a very high...
  • If a miracle cure existed that would cure cancer or autism, it’d be tempting to seek it out. The Genesis II Church of Health and Healing claims to offer that “miracle cure” for cancer, autism, and more. But it turns out the “miracle” remedy, which the church refers to as MMS (Miracle Mineral Solution), is a form of...
  • WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Liposuction may help people with lymphedema -- a painful, disfiguring swelling of the arms, hands, legs or feet. Harvard researchers used the surgical technique to remove fat from just underneath the skin in three people with the condition. Two of the patients had lymphedema...
  • Women diagnosed with breast cancer who want to freeze their eggs and embryos before tumor treatment leads to infertility can do this without delaying the start of chemotherapy, a U.S. study suggests. Researchers focused on 89 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer who received counseling at a fertility clinic about...
  • WEDNESDAY, Sept. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A breast cancer patient's choice of surgeon can have a major effect on her treatment, according to a new study. That's because surgeons have a strong influence on whether early stage cancer patients have both breasts removed even when cancer is found in only one breast --...
  • After hearing your doctor say “You’ve got breast cancer,” it’s hard to focus on what comes next. You’re understandably scared, and your mind probably is reeling. You’re not prepared – no one is – to have a conversation about your prognosis and medical choices. From oncologist Jame Abraham, MD, Director of Cleveland...
  • If you just found out you need cancer treatment, there are ways to prepare yourself. Being ready will help you overcome the uncertainty and anxiety that so often goes along with starting treatment.  No matter what, remember who’s in charge: you! Too many people don’t realize that they — not their doctors — are in...
  • When you’re going through cancer treatment, it’s important to ask any and all questions you have. It will help you prepare yourself while also allowing your family to understand how to best support you. In particular, you want to be sure you understand any cancer treatment you’ll receive, including its benefits,...