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  • DR. GOOGLE DOESN’T ALWAYS KNOW WHAT’S BEST. When faced with an actual or potential diagnosis of cancer, most people are inclined to consult Dr. Google, often before they see a real live medical expert. Unfortunately, Dr. Google doesn’t always know what’s best. A generation ago, patients were largely dependent upon the...
  • FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic testing should be made available to all patients with a history of breast cancer, according to an updated consensus guideline from the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBS). Researchers from the ASBS outlined recommendations for genetic testing that medical...
  • In a new study, researchers say more women should be tested for breast cancer genes. However, not everyone is so sure. Knowing if you have a gene mutation can help you take preventive action against breast cancer.  Inheriting certain genetic mutations from your mother or father can raise your risk of breast or ovarian...
  • Fake health news can do real harm. Here’s how to spot the difference between false stories and verified information. The spread of false medical information and news can create barriers between people and better healthcare.  Sleeping with raw, sliced onions in your socks can release toxins from your body. Two handfuls...
  • Cancer is a disease of mutations. Tumor cells are riddled with genetic mutations not found in healthy cells. Scientists estimate that it takes five to 10 key mutations for a healthy cell to become cancerous. Some of these mutations can be caused by assaults from the environment, such as ultraviolet rays and cigarette...
  • “Would you take health advice from a stranger on the street? If you wouldn’t, then don’t go to an online forum either,” says Anthony M. Cocco, a doctor at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Melbourne, and the lead author on a recent scientific study about the search habits of people before they show up in an E.R. Stick to...
  • TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 43 percent of patients diagnosed with breast cancer presenting to a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer center for a second opinion have a change in diagnosis, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Surgical Oncology. Denise...
  • No two cases of breast cancer are the same - but understanding the kind you've been diagnosed with gives you clues on what's to come. Getting a breast cancer diagnosis is scary, but knowing what type you have can help ease some of your fears-and understanding the type will help you and your doctor determine the best...
  • When you learn you have cancer, you want to know what to expect: How will doctors treat your illness? How effective is treatment likely to be? Much depends on the way doctors first classify, or “stage,” your cancer, using the official staging manual from the American Joint Committee on Cancer. Staging guidelines...
  • You can never be too safe when it comes to breast cancer. Doing self-exams, having mammograms and watching for warning signs can save your life. Raised awareness and more candidness about breast health is a good thing. But it also has fueled some common misperceptions. Holly Pederson, MD, Director of Medical Breast...
  • Overview Male breast cancer is a rare cancer that forms in the breast tissue of men. Though breast cancer is most commonly thought of as a disease that affects women, breast cancer does occur in men. Male breast cancer is most common in older men, though it can occur at any age. Men diagnosed with male breast cancer...
  • I knew, as soon as I heard the radiologist’s voice on the phone, that the news wasn’t good. “Is this an O.K. time to talk?” she asked. If everything was fine, she would have said that. Instead, she was saying, “I’m so sorry, but your biopsy came back positive for cancer.” Still in my pajamas, I scribbled down notes. “...
  • After discovering that you have breast cancer, your doctor will decide what additional tests may be helpful to find out if the disease has spread outside the breast. Called breast cancer staging, this process provides information about the extent of the disease. Your breast cancer stage helps your doctor determine...
  • (Reuters Health) - When patients misunderstand commonly used medical terms, communication and decision-making may suffer, UK researchers say. In a survey of London oral and maxillofacial surgery clinic patients, more than a third of participants did not know the meaning of terms like benign or lesion and more than...
  • Overview Breast cancer surgery is a key component of breast cancer treatment that involves removing the cancer with an operation. Breast cancer surgery may be used alone or in combination with other treatments, such as chemotherapy, hormone therapy, targeted therapy and radiation therapy. For people with a very high...
  • About a third of America's most common cancers can be prevented through healthy eating, regular physical activity, and maintaining a healthy weight, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research. But the wide range of cancer myths can make it hard to figure out what those healthy eating choices involve. EN...
  • In recent entertainment news, celebrities have talked about the importance of seeking a second medical opinion when you face a serious medical diagnosis. A second opinion allows you to determine if the diagnosis is correct, and it helps you determine if the recommended treatment is optimal for you. If a person is...
  • After hearing your doctor say “You’ve got breast cancer,” it’s hard to focus on what comes next. You’re understandably scared, and your mind probably is reeling. You’re not prepared – no one is – to have a conversation about your prognosis and medical choices. From oncologist Jame Abraham, MD, Director of Cleveland...
  • During our America's Most Amazing Nurse contest, on which we collaborated with The Doctors TV show, we asked Prevention readers to choose their Fan Favorite among our five finalists. (Meet our contest winner here!)  Drumroll, please...The winner of America's Most Amazing Nurse Fan Favorite is Sandy Cross, a breast...
  • FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Overall cancer death rates in the United States continue to fall, but racial gaps persist, a new report says. Death rates fell between 2010 and 2014 for 11 of the 16 most common cancers in men and for 13 of the most common types in women, including lung, colon, prostate and...