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  • Cancer survivors have been talking about ‘chemo brain’ for several years, now a team of researchers from Stanford University may have figured out why it happens and possibly, how to treat it. Picture credit: Getty Royalty Free. As anyone who has undergone cancer treatment will know, it comes with a host of unpleasant...
  • (Reuters Health) - - As a growing number of people live decades after a cancer diagnosis, doctors and scientists are developing treatment guidelines for survivors. But a U.S. report suggests more work is needed to improve the consistency and quality of survivorship care. It's been more than a decade since the...
  • If your friend, colleague, partner or family member has completed cancer treatment, you probably feel relieved that their treatment is over and was successful. And you probably imagine they’re feeling relieved, too. But cancer is an emotional roller coaster – and it doesn’t come to a screeching halt once treatment...
  • Medical professionals are ramping up programs to help cancer survivors deal with the emotional, physical, and financial aftermath. There are now more than 15 million cancer survivors in the United States.  The number of cancer survivors is growing. And they’re living longer. While advances in diagnosis and treatment...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Female cancer survivors exposed to potentially cardiotoxic treatments rarely develop new congestive heart failure (CHF) during pregnancy, researchers from Canada report. "The low incidence of cardiac complications in women without a prior history of cardiotoxicity was a very interesting...
  • Going through breast cancer treatment can make women feel “wounded.” Here’s how to revive your sex life. There are a number of side effects women feel after going through breast cancer treatment, but there are also things you can do to make sex enjoyable again.  For women experiencing cancer, intimacy is yet another...
  • Cardio could be the closest thing to a miracle drug that we have, but doing it shouldn't take a whole day. Instead, the available evidence suggests there's an ideal window for exercises like cycling, swimming, or brisk walking — and it's under an hour. All of these moves raise your heart rate and get you moving and...
  • (HealthDay News) -- After a mastectomy, many women prefer to wear a prosthesis, in lieu of reconstructive surgery. The prosthesis often is made of silicone gel or foam, and will be placed inside a bra or directly on a woman's chest. Sometimes. a prosthesis can pose difficulties when traveling by plane. The Susan G....
  • For the last two years or so, the artist Prune Nourry has thought of herself as a sculpture. Ms. Nourry, who is French and splits her time between Brooklyn and Paris, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2016. As she went through treatment, including chemotherapy and reconstructive surgery, she thought of her doctors...
  • Starting a new year, which many celebrate by looking ahead, may be a time of special reflection for those who are undergoing or who have finished cancer treatment. If this is you, consider making some New Year’s resolutions for your health and your life post-cancer. Resolutions can help to focus your actions in the...
  • Because he was in such a hurry to get to his granddaughter’s high school graduation, James Riddick did not realize he had forgotten his cane until he reached the bus. “Certain things you get so dependent on, it becomes like part of you,” said Mr. Riddick, 80. On that day, more than a year and a half ago, he stepped up...
  • When you began your cancer treatment, you couldn't wait for the day you'd finish. But now that you've completed your treatment, you aren't sure if you're ready for life after treatment as a cancer survivor. With your treatment completed, you'll likely see your cancer care team less often. Though you, your friends and...
  • (HealthDay News) -- If you're a cancer survivor, you may have mental health issues that affect your emotions, ability to concentrate, behavior and memory. Ten percent of adult cancer survivors feel they have mental health issues, compared with 6 percent of adults without a history of cancer, the U.S. Centers for...
  • But it's not all good news. Cancer has been one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. for years, so it’s understandable that you might be a little freaked out about the disease. But now, there’s some good news on the cancer front: Deaths from the disease are down 26 percent from their peak in 1991. That’s the...
  • Thanks to earlier identification and better treatment of , millions of women are surviving the disease. But even when they are cured, too many find they are living with a ghost that continues to haunt them. “Half to all of breast cancer survivors experience fear of recurrence. This fear can be significant and...
  • (Reuters Health) - Cancer patients may often experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the months after their tumors are diagnosed, and mental health issues can sometimes linger for years, a Malaysian study suggests. Six months after diagnosis, 22% of cancer patients reported symptoms of PTSD in clinical...
  • THURSDAY, Dec. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who survive breast cancer often experience lingering physical and emotional symptoms that go untreated, new research suggests. Ninety-two percent of long-term breast cancer survivors report at least three untreated symptoms for which they need assistance, according to...
  • Your friends and family love you and are worried about you — but they sometimes have strange ways of showing it. Some people withdraw and avoid talking to you. Others smother you and treat you like a child. Many cancer survivors find that one barrier to a smooth transition out of cancer treatment is the reaction they...
  • Q: I’ve had radiation therapy to the chest. Will heart surgery be riskier for me?  A: Radiation therapy to the chest to treat cancer — most often breast cancer or Hodgkin’s lymphoma — can lead to what’s known as radiation heart disease. This condition may develop in cancer survivors 10 or more years after their...
  • For breast cancer survivors, exercise may help lower their chances of dying from the disease more than other healthy habits, a new review suggests.   The Canadian researchers analyzed 67 published articles to see which habits made the most difference in reducing the risk of either breast cancer recurrence or death....