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  • TUESDAY, Oct. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite evidence to the contrary, four in 10 Americans believe alternative therapies can cure cancer, a new survey finds. Research shows that cancer death rates are much higher among patients who use only alternative therapies than among those who receive standard cancer...
  • (Reuters Health) - Patients, their families and friends may see clinical trial research as important, yet they don't know much about the research process and see trial participation as burdensome, a new study suggests. About 85 percent of respondents in the new study said clinical research is important to developing...
  • (Reuters Health) - Cancer drugs that keep tumors from growing may not lead to better quality of life for patients, a new study suggests. "In countries where patients need to pay co-pays, they can use up all their savings in order to get access to those expensive new drugs and in the end, they may not extend their...
  • How one woman fought for her family, and her health, after being diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer while pregnant. Getting the right advice after being diagnosed with breast cancer was a matter of life and death for Stephanie Hosford and her daughter. She didn’t know it yet, but finding a lump in her breast...
  • WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many older breast cancer patients might worry that they will be struck by "chemo brain" after their treatments, but a new study suggests that only those who carry a gene linked to Alzheimer's face that risk. Researchers found that breast cancer survivors carrying the APOE4...
  • TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 43 percent of patients diagnosed with breast cancer presenting to a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer center for a second opinion have a change in diagnosis, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Surgical Oncology. Denise...
  • AVOIDING EVIDENCE-BASED TREATMENTS IN FAVOR OF UNTESTED ONES CAN CONTRIBUTE TO HIGHER DEATH RATES, A YALE STUDY FOUND. A diagnosis of cancer, even an early-stage, highly curable cancer, can prompt some people to feel as if they’ve suddenly lost control of their future and that they must do whatever they can to regain...
  • (Reuters Health) - For women with early-stage breast cancer, many surgeons would advise extensive removal of the lymph nodes even though recent evidence shows this doesn't improve survival or the odds of cancer recurring, a U.S. study found. Nearly half of breast cancer surgeons surveyed said they would recommend...
  • A large breast cancer study has confirmed what doctors in recent years have suspected: Thousands of women with a common type of early-stage breast cancer will no longer need to undergo chemotherapy after surgery. The New England Journal of Medicine recently published results of the National Cancer Institute study...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Long-term satisfaction, quality of life and complication rates differ across various types of postmastectomy breast reconstruction, according to a pair of new studies. "While the risks and benefits of the various options must be carefully weighed, the 'pros' and 'cons' will not be the same...
  • TUESDAY, July 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to genetic testing for breast cancer patients, their surgeons wield great influence on that decision, new research shows. Genetic testing can provide important information that might affect treatment choices for breast cancer, but previous research shows that...
  • Many women with early-stage breast cancer who would receive chemotherapy under current standards do not actually need it, according to a major international study that is expected to quickly change medical treatment. “We can spare thousands and thousands of women from getting toxic treatment that really wouldn’t...
  • You can expect to see fewer women in the early stages of the most common type of breast cancer receiving chemotherapy in the near future. Researchers have unveiled a study suggesting that 70 percent of women with HER2-negative breast cancer that hasn’t spread to the lymph nodes get no extra benefits from undergoing...
  • Some women with breast cancer may be able to cut Herceptin treatment in half. Researchers overseeing a phase III randomized clinical trial have concluded that six months of treatment is “non-inferior” to the standard 12 months of Herceptin use. The study involved 4,088 participants with HER2-positive breast cancer....
  • (Reuters Health) - When terminally ill Americans receive experimental medicines through so-called "compassionate use" programs, they typically only get these drugs after extensive tests for safety and effectiveness, a U.S. study suggests. "This means that sufficient evidence of safety and effectiveness has been...
  • (Reuters Health) - Doctors who don't have palliative care training are more likely to recommend aggressive surgery for patients with life-limiting diseases, a study suggests. Researchers surveyed 102 surgeons, oncologists, intensive care specialists, and palliative care doctors near Sacramento, California, asking how...
  • It’s a pod-shaped machine that uses gamma radiation to target breast cancer tumors. And it could make a big difference for women in treatment for early stage breast cancer. The device also has the potential to shorten radiation treatment time and reduce harsh side effects. Late last year, the GammaPod was cleared by...
  • Overview Precision medicine for breast cancer is an approach to diagnosis, treatment and prevention that takes into account the genes you're born with (your genetic makeup) and the genes or others markers present within the cancer cells. With this approach, your blood or tumor tissue is collected for analysis, often...
  • Harvard Health Blog If you are like me, when you get the flu you head straight to the pharmacy and grab the most powerful over-the-counter medicine you can find. But is that really the best approach? After all, your condition, symptoms and reaction to the virus may be quite different from someone else's, so why use...
  • Some treatments for breast cancer can harm your heart. And heart disease is the number one cause of death for women in the United States. In fact, breast cancer survivors, particularly women over age 65, are more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than breast cancer, according to an American Heart Association...