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  • Herbal products and prescription drugs aren’t always a good mix. That’s the conclusion of a new study that sheds more light on which herbal remedies should send up a red flag for people on certain drugs. In addition to dangerous side effects, herbal products can impact the efficacy of the drugs, researchers said....
  • FRIDAY, Jan. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Lynparza (olaparib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat spreading breast cancer caused by a BRCA gene mutation. The drug is among a class called poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, which are designed to block an enzyme involved in...
  • TUESDAY, Jan. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Breakthroughs in breast cancer screening and treatment have slashed the percentage of women dying from the disease, a new analysis reveals. "Advances in screening and treatment are saving lives," said lead researcher Sylvia Plevritis, a professor of radiology and biomedical...
  • (Reuters Health) - Women with breast cancer often feel rushed to make a decision about surgery, and some of them might benefit from more time and better educational materials to inform their treatment choices, two recent studies suggest. One study surveyed 487 women after they underwent either a lumpectomy, a...
  • WEDNESDAY, Dec. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer women with early stage breast cancer are turning to chemotherapy to fight their disease, a new study finds. "For patients with early stage breast cancer, we've seen a significant decline in chemotherapy use over the last few years without a real change in evidence,"...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Young female cancer survivors face daunting decisions about whether to undergo fertility-preservation procedures, and they need better information and support, researchers say. "When a young woman is diagnosed with cancer, a whirlwind of tests, doctor visits, and procedures follows. The...
  • Overview Radiation therapy for breast cancer uses high-energy X-rays, protons or other particles to kill cancer cells. Rapidly growing cells, such as cancer cells, are more susceptible to the effects of radiation therapy than are normal cells. The X-rays or particles are painless and invisible. You are not...
  • Immunotherapy is revolutionizing the way doctors treat cancer. But it doesn’t work for everyone or for every type of cancer. What makes it a lifesaver for some people and completely ineffective for others? It all depends on the cancer — and on other factors that researchers are still trying to figure out. How does...
  • Overview Chemotherapy for breast cancer uses drugs to target and destroy breast cancer cells. These drugs are usually given directly into a vein through a needle or as a pill. Chemotherapy for breast cancer frequently is used in addition to other treatments, such as surgery, radiation or hormone therapy. Receiving...
  • If a miracle cure existed that would cure cancer or autism, it’d be tempting to seek it out. The Genesis II Church of Health and Healing claims to offer that “miracle cure” for cancer, autism, and more. But it turns out the “miracle” remedy, which the church refers to as MMS (Miracle Mineral Solution), is a form of...
  • Some of the most exciting advancements in cancer treatment involve biologic therapies. Made with living organisms, biologics prompt the immune system to kill cancer cells. Biosimilars are similar versions of biologics already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA approved the first...
  • (Reuters Health) - Many women with early-stage breast cancer have full-time jobs when they’re diagnosed, and they are more likely to miss at least a month of work when they receive aggressive treatment that includes surgery, a U.S. study suggests. The majority of women in the study had surgery - either a lumpectomy...
  • The FDA just approved a version of Avastin, a blockbuster chemotherapy made by Genentech that brought in $6.7 billion in sales in 2016.  The newly approved drug, made by Amgen, will go by the marketed name Mvasi. It's a type of medication called a "biosimilar."  Biosimilars are a bit more complicated than your average...
  • TUESDAY, Oct. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Machines armed with artificial intelligence may one day help doctors better identify high-risk breast lesions that might turn into cancer, new research suggests. High-risk breast lesions are abnormal cells found in a breast biopsy. These lesions pose a challenge to doctors...
  • LONDON (Reuters) - Cancer patients with high levels of good gut bacteria appear more likely to respond to immunotherapy, potentially opening up a new way to optimize the use of modern medicines that are highly effective but only work in some people. The finding, reported in two scientific papers on Thursday, suggests...
  • FRIDAY, Oct. 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Over five years, the proportion of U.S. breast cancer patients opting for breast reconstruction after mastectomy grew by about two-thirds, a new government report shows. An analysis of patient data shows breast reconstruction followed 40 percent of breast-removal surgeries in...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) have updated their joint recommendations on bone-modifying agents (BMAs) for women with metastatic breast cancer, with an emphasis on dosing intervals and management of bone pain. Senior author Dr. Beverly Moy of...
  • Q: Should doctors treat all breast cancer aggressively, just to be safe? A: There are more treatments available to help women with breast cancer today, but every woman with breast cancer simply doesn’t need every possible treatment. Doctors have studied and learned from past treatment results. This has allowed us to...
  • (Reuters) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Thursday it approved an Eli Lilly and Co drug to treat advanced breast cancer that has progressed following prior treatment. The drug, abemaciclib, which will be sold under the brand name Verzenio, will carry a list price before any discounts or rebates of...
  • Women with stage zero breast cancer may be getting more treatment than they need. Researchers are concerned about the effects of potential overtreatment, and are launching a study to learn more.  The prospective randomized clinical trial is called COMET. Its purpose is to compare active surveillance with usual care...