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  • Cancer kills more people in the United States than accidents, stroke, Alzheimer’s and diabetes combined. In 2017, despite spending 147 billion U.S. healthcare dollars on cancer care, 600,000 people died from cancer and 1.7 million new people were diagnosed with cancer. But the news is not all grim: in all, 2.6 million...
  • (HealthDay News) -- Before a new cancer treatment is available to the public, it must undergo vigorous evaluation, the American Cancer Society says. Typically, a new treatment is tested on cancer cells in a laboratory. If testing is deemed successful, there may be testing on animals, followed by testing on people....
  • You've marched in the Women's March, cheered for women in Congress, grappled with the wide-ranging implications of the MeToo movement, talked with your kids (of both genders) about sexual harassment. Wait -- did you forget to sign up for a medical study? In the new pantheon of Women's Causes We Care About, inclusion...
  • (Reuters Health) - Patients, their families and friends may see clinical trial research as important, yet they don't know much about the research process and see trial participation as burdensome, a new study suggests. About 85 percent of respondents in the new study said clinical research is important to developing...
  • When Ann Graham was diagnosed at age 43 with osteosarcoma, a rare bone cancer that typically occurs in children and young adults, all she really heard was “cancer,” not the “rare” part. But Graham, a nonprofit executive, married mother of three, and grandmother of one from Vermont, soon learned that while every cancer...
  • (Reuters Health) - When terminally ill Americans receive experimental medicines through so-called "compassionate use" programs, they typically only get these drugs after extensive tests for safety and effectiveness, a U.S. study suggests. "This means that sufficient evidence of safety and effectiveness has been...
  • A promising new field of cancer treatment called cancer immunotherapy has been exploding — and with it, hundreds of trials that aim to get to a better understanding of which combinations of treatments work and which don't. Dr. Norman Sharpless, the director of the National Cancer Institute, said that the agency has a...
  • By Reuters Staff (Reuters) - Tesaro Inc said on Wednesday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved an intravenous version of its drug to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in adults. The intravenous version of the already-approved drug, Varubi, will be used in combination with other agents to...