News Archive

  • If scrolling through our newsfeeds and swiping right were Olympic sports, we’d definitely take home a medal. But while we may only be working out our thumbs, that’s not to say our phones can’t help us lead healthier, happier lives—we just need to know the right apps to download. Before you fall down the rabbit hole...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Use of an artificial intelligence (AI)-based smartphone app can help reduce the severity of cancer pain and related hospital admissions, according to a new study. The findings were presented November 16 at the 2018 Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium in San Diego,...
  • Medical professionals are trying new therapies in an effort to reduce cancer treatment side effects such as lack of appetite and nerve problems. Aromatherapy is one of the new treatments being used by cancer patients to combat the side effects of chemotherapy.  Chemotherapy is often the best weapon against cancer. But...
  • WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17, 2018 (American Heart Association) -- The science behind why it's so difficult to quit smoking is crystal clear: Nicotine is addictive -- reportedly as addictive as cocaine or heroin. Yet any adult can stroll into a drug store and buy a pack of cigarettes, no questions asked. "From a scientific...
  • A Healthline writer recalls his conversations over the years with the billionaire philanthropist about how to live with cancer. “Don’t focus on the statistics because you just don’t know if you’re going to be in that 90 percent or in that 10 percent.” — Paul Allen (Getty Images) For all his well-documented success,...
  • (Reuters Health) - Art museums may have an analgesic effect on chronic pain, a small study suggests. Chronic pain sufferers who took guided tours of art museums felt less discomfort and unpleasantness related to their pain shortly afterward, researchers found. The researchers invited 54 visitors to the Crocker Art...
  • MyFitnessPal 1) MyFitnessPal MyFitnessPal has been around for a while, but it’s still the best app for tracking and motivation. Ranked as the #1 Health and Fitness app on iTunes, this app pushes users to keep tabs on their diet programs through an easy-to-use database that offers nutrition information for over 5...
  • You may find that cancer or cancer treatment has affected your sense of taste. Food may seem to lack flavor or taste too sweet, salty or metallic. Usually these changes are temporary and will improve with time. In the meantime, do what you can to maintain your calorie intake and meet your body's protein, vitamin and...
  • Sometimes cancer or cancer treatment can affect your appetite. Though you might not feel like eating, it's important to do what you can to maintain your calorie, protein and fluid intake during cancer treatment. Use this information to help plan meals and snacks that will be more appealing and provide the nutrition...
  • The timing of your last meal of the day may affect your risk of certain cancers, according to a new study. Researchers found that eating dinner before 9 p.m. or leaving at least two hours between dinner and bedtime can lower the risk of breast and prostate cancer by about 20 percent. The findings “highlight the...
  • FRIDAY, Feb. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Do you have things you want to do before your time's up? If so, consider sharing that so-called "bucket list" with your doctors. Those discussions could help your doctors provide health care that fits your life plans, researchers say. And for people with a chronic or even...
  • ARE YOUR FRIENDSHIPS GIVING YOU A BOOST OR BRINGING YOU DOWN? Are you spending time with the right people for your health and happiness? While many of us focus primarily on diet and exercise to achieve better health, science suggests that our well-being also is influenced by the company we keep. Researchers have found...
  • (HealthDay News) -- Radiation therapy to help fight cancer may be physically and emotionally draining. It's important to get plenty of sleep, eat a healthy and balanced diet and to stay as healthy as possible during your treatments. The American Cancer Society recommends: Get enough sleep. This may include naps during...
  • (Reuters Health) - People who get diagnosed with cancer may be more likely to develop diabetes, a Korean study suggests. The study included 524,089 men and women, ages 20 to 70, who didn't have cancer or diabetes at the start. By the time half the participants had been in the study for at least seven years, 15,130...
  • It was a big deal for Melanie Kennedy, a former accountant from Bangor, Northern Ireland, to indulge in a massage at the spa at Culloden Estate and Spa, in Belfast, earlier this year. Ms. Kennedy has stage four incurable breast cancer, and getting spa treatments have been a challenge ever since she was diagnosed...
  • Detox in a day! Feel healthier in just hours! Lose 5 pounds in a week! There are plenty of health promises out there that might sound great, but most of them simply don't stack up. However, as scientists learn more about how our bodies work, evidence has mounted in support of some simple things that you can do every...
  • You may have noticed there’s a new diet creating a lot of noise in the health and wellness scene. It’s the Nordic diet, and some nutritionists think it may be one of the healthiest ways to eat. The diet was constructed when health experts set out to find why, exactly, Northern Europe had lower obesity rates than the...
  • TALISMANS AND AMULETS — OBJECTS BELIEVED TO HAVE MAGICAL POWERS — WERE ONCE PART OF ANY SELF-RESPECTING DOCTOR’S MEDICINE BAG. The velvety rabbit with big floppy ears and a silver tiara came to me 34 years ago with a nametag that read, “Fairy God Bunny.” That was when I was in my mid-20s and had cancer. For five years...
  • TUESDAY, June 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a nutritionally balanced high-quality diet may lower a cancer patient's risk of dying by as much as 65 percent, new research suggests. The finding that total diet, rather than specific nutritional components, can affect a cancer patient's prognosis "was particularly...
  • If you’re an adult over age 50 receiving chemotherapy for cancer, you can now take steps to cut your risk for shingles, a painful infection caused by the same virus as the chicken pox. Preventative options were once limited because the original shingles vaccine, called Zostavax®, was not an option for anyone with a...