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  • (Reuters Health) - People who get diagnosed with cancer may be more likely to develop diabetes, a Korean study suggests. The study included 524,089 men and women, ages 20 to 70, who didn't have cancer or diabetes at the start. By the time half the participants had been in the study for at least seven years, 15,130...
  • It was a big deal for Melanie Kennedy, a former accountant from Bangor, Northern Ireland, to indulge in a massage at the spa at Culloden Estate and Spa, in Belfast, earlier this year. Ms. Kennedy has stage four incurable breast cancer, and getting spa treatments have been a challenge ever since she was diagnosed...
  • Detox in a day! Feel healthier in just hours! Lose 5 pounds in a week! There are plenty of health promises out there that might sound great, but most of them simply don't stack up. However, as scientists learn more about how our bodies work, evidence has mounted in support of some simple things that you can do every...
  • You may have noticed there’s a new diet creating a lot of noise in the health and wellness scene. It’s the Nordic diet, and some nutritionists think it may be one of the healthiest ways to eat. The diet was constructed when health experts set out to find why, exactly, Northern Europe had lower obesity rates than the...
  • TALISMANS AND AMULETS — OBJECTS BELIEVED TO HAVE MAGICAL POWERS — WERE ONCE PART OF ANY SELF-RESPECTING DOCTOR’S MEDICINE BAG. The velvety rabbit with big floppy ears and a silver tiara came to me 34 years ago with a nametag that read, “Fairy God Bunny.” That was when I was in my mid-20s and had cancer. For five years...
  • TUESDAY, June 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a nutritionally balanced high-quality diet may lower a cancer patient's risk of dying by as much as 65 percent, new research suggests. The finding that total diet, rather than specific nutritional components, can affect a cancer patient's prognosis "was particularly...
  • If you’re an adult over age 50 receiving chemotherapy for cancer, you can now take steps to cut your risk for shingles, a painful infection caused by the same virus as the chicken pox. Preventative options were once limited because the original shingles vaccine, called Zostavax®, was not an option for anyone with a...
  • (HealthDay News) -- It's common to be frequently stressed. When faced with a stressful situation, according to the American Cancer Society, your pulse quickens, you breathe faster, your muscles tense and your brain uses more oxygen. If your stress lasts too long, however, it can harm your health. The Cancer Society...
  • (Reuters Health) - For elderly patients with cancer - who often focus on making the most of the time they have left - financial stability, leisure pursuits and physical activity may have large influences on quality of life, a U.S. study suggests. Almost two-thirds of the 15 million people living with cancer nationwide...
  • FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with unsightly scars from cancer surgeries may benefit from "medical tattoos" that can help restore some of the skin's natural appearance, Dutch researchers report. The researchers surveyed 56 patients who got medical tattoos on their head and neck, and found they...
  • (Reuters Health) - Cancer patients may often experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the months after their tumors are diagnosed, and mental health issues can sometimes linger for years, a Malaysian study suggests. Six months after diagnosis, 22% of cancer patients reported symptoms of PTSD in clinical...
  • (HealthDay News) -- Since people with cancer typically have a weakened immune system, they may be at greater risk of contracting foodborne illness. Radiation and chemotherapy often weaken the body's immune system by affecting the blood cells that protect against germs and disease. Foodsafety.gov suggests these steps...
  • Contributor:  Neha Vyas, MD One of the most important health matters I discuss with my patients is depression and the impact it can have on an individual and his or her loved ones. Do you know the signs and symptoms of depression? Recognizing them allows you to get the help you or a loved one may need to manage this...
  • If stress has you anxious, tense and worried, consider trying meditation. Spending even a few minutes in meditation can restore your calm and inner peace. Anyone can practice meditation. It's simple and inexpensive, and it doesn't require any special equipment. And you can practice meditation wherever you are —...
  • MONDAY, Sept. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Participation in a Tibetan yoga program (TYP) during chemotherapy results in modest, short-term benefits in sleep quality, with long-term benefits seen over time for those who practice at least two times a week, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in Cancer....
  • Chemotherapy is often associated with nausea and vomiting. For a long time, they were among the top concerns of chemotherapy patients. Due to newer anti-nausea medications, they’ve become less of a problem. Today, patients are more likely to cite socio-psychological factors as the most significant concerns of...
  • Your mom always told you to eat your vegetables Mom knows best: A compound found in certain vegetables like broccoli may play a role in treating melanoma, new research in the European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry suggests. In the study, researchers developed a drug based on naturally-occurring compounds called...
  • When you or someone you love has cancer, a range of emotions — fear, anger, sadness — may overwhelm you at times. It’s difficult to know how to channel those feelings. But art therapy can help you express yourself and cope with stress and anxiety. Art therapist Lisa Shea, MAT, says art therapy can help both the person...
  • The following 10 rules will help you use superfoods in the right combination with other important nutrients to maximize your health effects, especially in an effort to reverse mild cognitive impairment (MCI), increase attention, and improve mood. Keep these rules in mind as you create your own eating plan:   Rule #1:...
  • A positive attitude is important to overall health, but a new study suggests a bright outlook could play a major role in how someone handles cancer treatments. Researchers from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center say that patients who had psychosocial issues such as anxiety, depression, low optimism...