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  • DR. GOOGLE DOESN’T ALWAYS KNOW WHAT’S BEST. When faced with an actual or potential diagnosis of cancer, most people are inclined to consult Dr. Google, often before they see a real live medical expert. Unfortunately, Dr. Google doesn’t always know what’s best. A generation ago, patients were largely dependent upon the...
  • FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic testing should be made available to all patients with a history of breast cancer, according to an updated consensus guideline from the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBS). Researchers from the ASBS outlined recommendations for genetic testing that medical...
  • In a new study, researchers say more women should be tested for breast cancer genes. However, not everyone is so sure. Knowing if you have a gene mutation can help you take preventive action against breast cancer.  Inheriting certain genetic mutations from your mother or father can raise your risk of breast or ovarian...
  • Fake health news can do real harm. Here’s how to spot the difference between false stories and verified information. The spread of false medical information and news can create barriers between people and better healthcare.  Sleeping with raw, sliced onions in your socks can release toxins from your body. Two handfuls...
  • Cancer is a disease of mutations. Tumor cells are riddled with genetic mutations not found in healthy cells. Scientists estimate that it takes five to 10 key mutations for a healthy cell to become cancerous. Some of these mutations can be caused by assaults from the environment, such as ultraviolet rays and cigarette...
  • “Would you take health advice from a stranger on the street? If you wouldn’t, then don’t go to an online forum either,” says Anthony M. Cocco, a doctor at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Melbourne, and the lead author on a recent scientific study about the search habits of people before they show up in an E.R. Stick to...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Testing for mutations in the ALK gene in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are candidates for targeted therapy nearly doubled from 2011 to 2016, according to a new study in U.S. community practices. "That's very, very encouraging," Dr. Peter B. Illei of Johns Hopkins...
  • Lung cancer can strike people who have never even touched a cigarette. When someone who has smoked cigarettes their entire life winds up with lung cancer, it’s sad-but not exactly surprising. The harmful effects of smoking are well researched and documented, and cigarette smoking is by far the number one risk factor...
  • TUESDAY, Oct. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 43 percent of patients diagnosed with breast cancer presenting to a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer center for a second opinion have a change in diagnosis, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Surgical Oncology. Denise...
  • Overview Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (mak-roe-glob-u-lih-NEE-me-uh) is a rare type of cancer that begins in the white blood cells. If you have Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, your bone marrow produces too many abnormal white blood cells that crowd out healthy blood cells. The abnormal white blood cells produce a...
  • No two cases of breast cancer are the same - but understanding the kind you've been diagnosed with gives you clues on what's to come. Getting a breast cancer diagnosis is scary, but knowing what type you have can help ease some of your fears-and understanding the type will help you and your doctor determine the best...
  • Overview Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a type of cancer of the blood and bone marrow — the spongy tissue inside bones where blood cells are made. The term "chronic" in chronic lymphocytic leukemia comes from the fact that it typically progresses more slowly than other types of leukemia. The term "lymphocytic...
  • When you learn you have cancer, you want to know what to expect: How will doctors treat your illness? How effective is treatment likely to be? Much depends on the way doctors first classify, or “stage,” your cancer, using the official staging manual from the American Joint Committee on Cancer. Staging guidelines...
  • You can never be too safe when it comes to breast cancer. Doing self-exams, having mammograms and watching for warning signs can save your life. Raised awareness and more candidness about breast health is a good thing. But it also has fueled some common misperceptions. Holly Pederson, MD, Director of Medical Breast...
  • Overview Male breast cancer is a rare cancer that forms in the breast tissue of men. Though breast cancer is most commonly thought of as a disease that affects women, breast cancer does occur in men. Male breast cancer is most common in older men, though it can occur at any age. Men diagnosed with male breast cancer...
  • Cancer screening tests — including the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test to look for signs of prostate cancer — can be a good idea. Prostate cancer screening can help identify cancer early on, when treatment is most effective. And a normal PSA test, combined with a digital rectal exam, can help reassure you that...
  • I knew, as soon as I heard the radiologist’s voice on the phone, that the news wasn’t good. “Is this an O.K. time to talk?” she asked. If everything was fine, she would have said that. Instead, she was saying, “I’m so sorry, but your biopsy came back positive for cancer.” Still in my pajamas, I scribbled down notes. “...
  • Overview Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is cancer that originates in your lymphatic system, the disease-fighting network spread throughout your body. In non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, tumors develop from lymphocytes — a type of white blood cell. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is more common than the other general type of lymphoma — Hodgkin...
  • What's the difference between Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma? Both Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma are lymphomas — a type of cancer that begins in a subset of white blood cells called lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are an integral part of your immune system, which protects you from germs. The main...
  • After discovering that you have breast cancer, your doctor will decide what additional tests may be helpful to find out if the disease has spread outside the breast. Called breast cancer staging, this process provides information about the extent of the disease. Your breast cancer stage helps your doctor determine...