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  • By Diane Galvin, PT “I know I’m supposed to exercise, but I’m just too tired.” This is the comment I hear from so many of my breast cancer patients. I am a physical therapist who sees women after they have had a mastectomy, reconstruction, chemotherapy, radiation — or any combination of those treatments. What is the...
  • (Reuters Health) - Nordic walking, an aerobic activity performed with walking poles similar to ski poles, may benefit patients with breast cancer, according to a review of existing research. The low-impact exercise improved swelling, physical fitness, disability and quality of life, the study authors conclude in the...
  • Experts say the trauma and intensity of cancer treatments can cause insomnia. Cognitive behavioral therapy can help.  Researchers say cognitive behavioral therapy is the most effective way to treat insomnia in cancer survivors. They say the intensity and trauma of cancer diagnosis and treatment causes insomnia in up...
  • FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has clarified that the new guideline on prescribing opioids for chronic pain is not meant to limit access to appropriate pain management, according to a letter issued to the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the...
  • A recent study found that acupressure could help alleviate mulitple symptoms women often experience after breast cancer treatment. Acupressure involves applying pressure to specific points in the body to help with certain symptoms.  A new study suggests that self-administered acupressure may help ease several long-...
  • Medical professionals are ramping up programs to help cancer survivors deal with the emotional, physical, and financial aftermath. There are now more than 15 million cancer survivors in the United States.  The number of cancer survivors is growing. And they’re living longer. While advances in diagnosis and treatment...
  • MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite a flood of news reports on the opioid crisis, many people still want the potentially addictive painkillers after surgery, a new survey suggests. The survey, of more than 500 patients scheduled for surgery, found that more than three-quarters expected to get opioids...
  • WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Many older breast cancer patients might worry that they will be struck by "chemo brain" after their treatments, but a new study suggests that only those who carry a gene linked to Alzheimer's face that risk. Researchers found that breast cancer survivors carrying the APOE4...
  • Going through breast cancer treatment can make women feel “wounded.” Here’s how to revive your sex life. There are a number of side effects women feel after going through breast cancer treatment, but there are also things you can do to make sex enjoyable again.  For women experiencing cancer, intimacy is yet another...
  • The Technique places implants on top of the muscle, instead of under it. Before Deborah Cohan had a double mastectomy and breast reconstruction five years ago, her plastic surgeon explained that he would “create a little pocket” behind her chest muscle and “slip the implant in.” Her doctor glossed over the part of the...
  • WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For women who have their breast removed while fighting cancer, using their own tissue for breast reconstruction is better than implants, a new study suggests. More than 60 percent of women who undergo breast removal to treat breast cancer decide to have breast...
  • THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Testing for small changes in the flow of lymph fluids after breast cancer surgery can spot the start of a painful swelling known as lymphedema before it becomes hard to treat, a new study suggests. Evaluating nearly 150 breast cancer patients considered at high risk for...
  • THURSDAY, Oct. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that offers some hope to those fighting lung cancer, researchers report that survival rates have improved among those with early stage disease. "More and more patients are being cured of lung cancer, with both surgery and radiation as good treatment options,"...
  • THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Surviving a cancer when young may leave some women with another health issue: An increased risk for certain pregnancy complications. That's the conclusion of a new study of more than 15,000 births to teen and young adult women, aged 15 to 39, living in North Carolina. Those...
  • Many non-hormone options and therapies are available for the treatment of estrogen-depletion symptoms in breast cancer survivors, and individualized treatment is important, according to a review published online Aug. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Richard J. Santen, M.D., from the...
  • Your cancer treatment is over, but the treatments that may have saved your life may also continue to cause side effects. As more people are living longer after cancer treatment, more is becoming known about late side effects of cancer treatment. Find out all you can about late effects of cancer treatment, and use...
  • Getting through cancer treatment successfully is something to celebrate. To stay in good health, doctors say you need to watch for other symptoms, including vision changes, headaches and problems with balance.  Many cancer survivors don’t realize that 25 percent of people who survive some common cancers go on to...
  • Jess Ekstrom was just 20 years old and a junior at North Carolina State University when she found her calling. She was an intern with the Make-A-Wish Foundation, a wish-granting organization for kids with life-threatening illnesses, and was spending lots of time with children with cancer who’d lost their hair during...