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  • FRIDAY, Jan. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with increased recurrence among men with prostate cancer who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP), according to a study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference -- Obesity and Cancer: Mechanisms...
  • (Reuters Health) - - For cancer survivors, three seasons of home vegetable gardening may increase physical activity, fruits and vegetables in the diet and also enhance feelings of self-worth, researchers say. Possibly as a result of these healthy behaviors, gardeners in the small study also tended to gain less weight...
  • FRIDAY, Jan. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity and other health problems may boost the chances of cancer returning after a man has his prostate removed, a new study finds. "Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men, and up to 30 percent of patients will develop recurrence after [prostate removal]," said...
  • MONDAY, Jan. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Longer survival after breast cancer may be as simple as staying fit, new research shows. In the new study, regular exercise appeared to reduce breast cancer survivors' risk of heart disease, diabetes and possibly even the odds for breast cancer's return. One breast cancer...
  • US News & World Report ranked the DASH and Mediterranean diets as the top picks for diets to try in 2018.  The diets differ a bit in their approaches to healthy eating, but both emphasize fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.  Here are the steps to take to try each diet.  Finding a healthy diet and sticking to it...
  • Want an all-natural way to lift your mood, improve your memory, and protect your brain against the decline that comes with aging? Get moving. Exercises that get your heart pumping and sweat flowing — known as aerobic exercise, or "cardio" — have significant and beneficial effects on the brain and body, according to a...
  • TUESDAY, Dec. 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A physical activity intervention reduces perceived sleep dysfunction at three and six months for post-primary treatment breast cancer survivors, according to a study published recently in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Laura Q. Rogers, M.D., M.P.H., from the...
  • Q: Will taking supplements improve my prostate health? A: Because supplements do not have to go through clinical trials or get FDA approval, we have very little data on many of them. Saw palmetto is probably the most common supplement used to promote prostate health. Most people take 320 milligrams per day. But while...
  • THURSDAY, Dec. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who survive breast cancer often experience lingering physical and emotional symptoms that go untreated, new research suggests. Ninety-two percent of long-term breast cancer survivors report at least three untreated symptoms for which they need assistance, according to...
  • Your doctor has probably told you to avoid certain foods and eat more of others. But do you ever wish you could just tag along on her next trip to the grocery store to see how she shops for nutritious food? Michael Ruhlman, a chef and author, does just that in his book "Grocery: The Buying and Selling of Food in...
  • Your mom always told you to eat your vegetables Mom knows best: A compound found in certain vegetables like broccoli may play a role in treating melanoma, new research in the European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry suggests. In the study, researchers developed a drug based on naturally-occurring compounds called...
  • The following 10 rules will help you use superfoods in the right combination with other important nutrients to maximize your health effects, especially in an effort to reverse mild cognitive impairment (MCI), increase attention, and improve mood. Keep these rules in mind as you create your own eating plan:   Rule #1:...
  • For breast cancer survivors, exercise may help lower their chances of dying from the disease more than other healthy habits, a new review suggests.   The Canadian researchers analyzed 67 published articles to see which habits made the most difference in reducing the risk of either breast cancer recurrence or death....
  • The attendant walked into the hospital waiting room and called my name. I took a deep breath and hurried through the door. “I’m always surprised when my name is pronounced properly at a doctor’s office,” I said. He chuckled. “You’ve been here before.” “Yes,” I said. “Today are my five-year scans.” “You’re a frequent...
  • Don’t fall for any B.S. In the past year, I've gotten more questions from friends and acquaintances about health headlines they saw online than I ever have before. Can waist trainers really shrink love handles? Taking antibiotics for a cold is OK, right? OMG, do I really not need to floss?   I'm no doctor, but as the...
  • Saving money on your grocery bill is a beautiful thing. And when you're committed to eating clean, there are plenty of ways to do it—seriously. It's possible to make entire meals out of cheap bulk bin foods like oatmeal and dried fruit, or rice and beans.   Of course, there are some foods where springing for the...
  • In these turbulent times, it may be a struggle to maintain a glass half full view of life. A poll released by the Associated Press on Jan. 1 indicated that most Americans came out of 2016 feeling pretty discouraged. Only 18 percent feel things for the country got better, 33 percent said things got worse, and 47...
  • Want an all-natural way to lift your mood, improve your memory, and protect your brain against age-related cognitive decline? Get moving. A wealth of recent research, including a new study published this month, suggests that any type of exercise that raises your heart rate and gets you moving and sweating for a...
  • ​Timing isn’t everything, but it’s a big thing What you eat matters most. (Probably.) But, more and more, researchers are finding when you eat also affects your risk for obesity and several other serious—and seriously common—health problems. “When you look at the world’s healthiest populations, none of them are eating...
  • Many people spend their workdays indoors under fluorescent lights and in front of computers, then return home to bask in the glow of television screens. But spending too much time inside isn't good for us. And nature is beneficial — maybe essential — for human health. Psychologists and health researchers are finding ...