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  • If you're being treated for cancer, you might have questions about fertility preservation. Find out how cancer treatment can affect your ability to have a child, as well as what fertility preservation steps you can take before you begin cancer treatment. How does cancer treatment affect fertility? Certain cancer...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Thin or moderate application of a topical agent before radiation therapy is unlikely to affect the skin dose, although a thick amount should be avoided, researchers say. "Radiation dermatitis is common and often treated with topical therapy," Dr. Brian Baumann of Washington University in St...
  • Returning to regular life at home after lung cancer surgery can be daunting. Hopefully you’ll have close friends or family members around to help you adjust. But still, you’re not feeling your best, and leaving the hospital is leaving the comfort and security of having nurses and doctors around to check on you...
  • Women tell Healthline how they made their decision to “go flat” or undergo reconstruction surgery. Women have many options and factors to consider after they have surgery for breast cancer. Getty Images About 266,120 women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year. Only about 23 percent of...
  • If you're considering breast implants, you might wonder how to choose between saline-filled and silicone gel-filled implants. Here's help evaluating the options. What's the difference between saline and silicone breast implants? Saline and silicone breast implants both have an outer silicone shell. The implants...
  • Overview Splenectomy is a surgical procedure to remove your spleen. The spleen is an organ that sits under your rib cage on the upper left side of your abdomen. It helps fight infection and filters unneeded material, such as old or damaged blood cells, from your blood. The most common reason for splenectomy is to...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A large study of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LL) is finding survival rates never seen before, according to researchers. In a large, federally funded, randomized phase 3 clinical trial, 90% of children and young adults with T...
  • WEDNESDAY, June 20, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For women who have their breast removed while fighting cancer, using their own tissue for breast reconstruction is better than implants, a new study suggests. More than 60 percent of women who undergo breast removal to treat breast cancer decide to have breast...
  • THURSDAY, May 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels three months after radiotherapy (RT) are strong markers of prostate cancer outcomes for patients with intermediate- and high-risk disease, according to a study published online May 4 in Cancer. Alex K. Bryant, from University of...
  • WEDNESDAY, March 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For men with metastatic prostate cancer, there is no survival advantage for aggressive therapy over conservative androgen deprivation therapy only, according to a study published online March 2 in Cancer. Marc A. Dall'Era, M.D., from the University of California at Davis...
  • THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Adult women undergoing mastectomy underestimate future well-being after mastectomy alone and overestimate well-being after reconstruction, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in JAMA Surgery. Clara Nan-hi Lee, M.D., M.P.P., from The Ohio State University in Columbus...
  • (Reuters Health) - Women who have one or both breasts removed to treat cancer may have unrealistic expectations about how they’ll feel after that surgery and after breast reconstruction, if they choose that option, a U.S. study suggests. For the study, researchers surveyed 96 women with breast cancer before they had a...
  • WEDNESDAY, Jan. 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a bone cancer drug once every three months, instead of monthly, does not boost the risk of bone problems over two years, a new study finds.  That could reduce side effects from the drug, known as zoledronic acid (Zometa), and increase cost savings, the researchers...
  • Getting through cancer treatment successfully is something to celebrate. To stay in good health, doctors say you need to watch for other symptoms, including vision changes, headaches and problems with balance.  Many cancer survivors don’t realize that 25 percent of people who survive some common cancers go on to...
  • 1. Less hair loss was observed in women who received scalp cooling prior to the start of adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. 2. Improved quality of life measures were observed with the use of this scalp cooling device. Evidence Rating Level: 2 (Good) Study Rundown: Hair loss remains one of the most...
  • Many women being treated for breast cancer suffer from severe treatment side effects even when they don’t receive chemotherapy, a recent study suggests. For the study, researchers surveyed 1,945 women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer about the severity of seven treatment side effects: nausea and vomiting,...
  • After hearing your doctor say “You’ve got breast cancer,” it’s hard to focus on what comes next. You’re understandably scared, and your mind probably is reeling. You’re not prepared – no one is – to have a conversation about your prognosis and medical choices. From oncologist Jame Abraham, MD, Director of Cleveland...
  • You’ve just been diagnosed with cancer and chemotherapy is part of your treatment. Getting this news is scary. The thought of chemotherapy is frightening too. Yet the more you know about chemotherapy the less intimidating it will become for you. There are many resources to help you through the process and understand...
  • After breast cancer surgery, many women are caught off guard by a lack of sensation in their breast(s) and other affected areas.  They have a lumpectomy, mastectomy or reconstruction and ask: “Am I ever going to get any feeling back… in my armpit? …over the scar? …on the inside of my arm?” They might comment on the...
  • (Reuters Health) - Cancer patients receiving chemotherapy should have all their medications and herbal supplements reviewed by a pharmacist who specializes in cancer therapy, researchers say. More than half the patients in a recent study reported taking prescription medications, over-the-counter drugs or herbal...