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  • By Diane Galvin, PT “I know I’m supposed to exercise, but I’m just too tired.” This is the comment I hear from so many of my breast cancer patients. I am a physical therapist who sees women after they have had a mastectomy, reconstruction, chemotherapy, radiation — or any combination of those treatments. What is the...
  • (Reuters Health) - Nordic walking, an aerobic activity performed with walking poles similar to ski poles, may benefit patients with breast cancer, according to a review of existing research. The low-impact exercise improved swelling, physical fitness, disability and quality of life, the study authors conclude in the...
  • FRIDAY, April 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has clarified that the new guideline on prescribing opioids for chronic pain is not meant to limit access to appropriate pain management, according to a letter issued to the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the...
  • American women, as a whole, are waiting longer to get married and have children. And more of them than ever are choosing to freeze their eggs during their most fertile years with the hopes of improving their chances of being able to get pregnant later in life. This fertility technology has been praised for enabling...
  • Cancer survivors have been talking about ‘chemo brain’ for several years, now a team of researchers from Stanford University may have figured out why it happens and possibly, how to treat it. Picture credit: Getty Royalty Free. As anyone who has undergone cancer treatment will know, it comes with a host of unpleasant...
  • A recent study found that acupressure could help alleviate mulitple symptoms women often experience after breast cancer treatment. Acupressure involves applying pressure to specific points in the body to help with certain symptoms.  A new study suggests that self-administered acupressure may help ease several long-...
  • Harvard Health Blog When I'm dragging and feeling tired during the occasional low-energy day, my go-to elixir is an extra cup (or two or three) of black French press coffee. It gives my body and brain a needed jolt, but it may not help where I need it the most: my cells.   The cellular basis of being tired What we...
  • FRIDAY, Feb. 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Instead of popping a painkiller, a little mindful yoga might go a long way toward easing longstanding pain, a new study suggests. The review of 21 clinical trials involving nearly 2,000 people looked at the effects of two drug-free options for chronic pain: cognitive behavioral...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Cooling the scalp may help prevent taxane-induced alopecia, whereas frozen gloves and socks may prevent nail and cutaneous side effects of the drugs, researchers say. "I absolutely recommend these cooling modalities," Dr. Adam Friedman of George Washington University School of Medicine and...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Thin or moderate application of a topical agent before radiation therapy is unlikely to affect the skin dose, although a thick amount should be avoided, researchers say. "Radiation dermatitis is common and often treated with topical therapy," Dr. Brian Baumann of Washington University in St...
  • Returning to regular life at home after lung cancer surgery can be daunting. Hopefully you’ll have close friends or family members around to help you adjust. But still, you’re not feeling your best, and leaving the hospital is leaving the comfort and security of having nurses and doctors around to check on you...
  • Whether you undergo surgery or radiation to treat your prostate cancer, chances are you’ll contend with urinary and sexual side effects afterward. Both radical prostatectomy and radiation treatments can damage the delicate structures surrounding the prostate that control urination and erections, leading to urinary...
  • MONDAY, Oct. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Despite a flood of news reports on the opioid crisis, many people still want the potentially addictive painkillers after surgery, a new survey suggests. The survey, of more than 500 patients scheduled for surgery, found that more than three-quarters expected to get opioids...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Use of an artificial intelligence (AI)-based smartphone app can help reduce the severity of cancer pain and related hospital admissions, according to a new study. The findings were presented November 16 at the 2018 Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium in San Diego,...
  • Medical professionals are trying new therapies in an effort to reduce cancer treatment side effects such as lack of appetite and nerve problems. Aromatherapy is one of the new treatments being used by cancer patients to combat the side effects of chemotherapy.  Chemotherapy is often the best weapon against cancer. But...
  • THURSDAY, Oct. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Lisa Hanson was first diagnosed with the leg swelling and fluid retention of lymphedema when she was just 17. Now in her 40s, she reconciled herself to a lifetime of long pants, compression hose and a nightly, hours-long bout with an electric pump to keep the swelling down....
  • (HealthDay News) -- Radiation therapy or certain types of chemotherapy can lead to dry mouth or thick saliva. During cancer treatment, the glands that make saliva often get irritated and make less saliva, or the saliva becomes thick and sticky. The American Cancer Society suggests how to help manage these side effects...
  • Fatigue, usually described as feeling tired, weak or exhausted, affects most people during cancer treatment. Cancer fatigue can result from the side effects of treatment or the cancer itself. Causes of cancer fatigue Cancer fatigue may be caused by many factors, and the factors that contribute to your cancer...
  • Heather Von St. James has learned to write things down. “It’s more than being forgetful. It’s almost as if parts of my memory are missing,” the 49-year-old Minnesota resident told Healthline. Von St. James is referring to the long-term effects of the chemotherapy she had 12 years ago. She’s talking about “chemo brain...
  • MONDAY, April 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise and healthy eating can counter the harmful side effects of hormone therapy for prostate cancer, a new study suggests. Androgen-deprivation therapy suppresses testosterone and other male hormones that drive prostate cancer growth. But suppressing those hormones leads...