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  • DR. GOOGLE DOESN’T ALWAYS KNOW WHAT’S BEST. When faced with an actual or potential diagnosis of cancer, most people are inclined to consult Dr. Google, often before they see a real live medical expert. Unfortunately, Dr. Google doesn’t always know what’s best. A generation ago, patients were largely dependent upon the...
  • Fake health news can do real harm. Here’s how to spot the difference between false stories and verified information. The spread of false medical information and news can create barriers between people and better healthcare.  Sleeping with raw, sliced onions in your socks can release toxins from your body. Two handfuls...
  • Cancer is a disease of mutations. Tumor cells are riddled with genetic mutations not found in healthy cells. Scientists estimate that it takes five to 10 key mutations for a healthy cell to become cancerous. Some of these mutations can be caused by assaults from the environment, such as ultraviolet rays and cigarette...
  • “Would you take health advice from a stranger on the street? If you wouldn’t, then don’t go to an online forum either,” says Anthony M. Cocco, a doctor at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Melbourne, and the lead author on a recent scientific study about the search habits of people before they show up in an E.R. Stick to...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Testing for mutations in the ALK gene in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are candidates for targeted therapy nearly doubled from 2011 to 2016, according to a new study in U.S. community practices. "That's very, very encouraging," Dr. Peter B. Illei of Johns Hopkins...
  • Lung cancer can strike people who have never even touched a cigarette. When someone who has smoked cigarettes their entire life winds up with lung cancer, it’s sad-but not exactly surprising. The harmful effects of smoking are well researched and documented, and cigarette smoking is by far the number one risk factor...
  • When you learn you have cancer, you want to know what to expect: How will doctors treat your illness? How effective is treatment likely to be? Much depends on the way doctors first classify, or “stage,” your cancer, using the official staging manual from the American Joint Committee on Cancer. Staging guidelines...
  • Overview Lung cancer is a type of cancer that begins in the lungs. Your lungs are two spongy organs in your chest that take in oxygen when you inhale and release carbon dioxide when you exhale. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, among both men and women. Lung cancer claims more...
  • (Reuters Health) - When patients misunderstand commonly used medical terms, communication and decision-making may suffer, UK researchers say. In a survey of London oral and maxillofacial surgery clinic patients, more than a third of participants did not know the meaning of terms like benign or lesion and more than...
  • About a third of America's most common cancers can be prevented through healthy eating, regular physical activity, and maintaining a healthy weight, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research. But the wide range of cancer myths can make it hard to figure out what those healthy eating choices involve. EN...
  • In recent entertainment news, celebrities have talked about the importance of seeking a second medical opinion when you face a serious medical diagnosis. A second opinion allows you to determine if the diagnosis is correct, and it helps you determine if the recommended treatment is optimal for you. If a person is...
  • You know that smoking and secondhand smoke (smoke from a burning cigarette and exhaled by a smoker) are unhealthy. But another danger may surprise you — thirdhand smoke, which is residue that lingers long after you empty the ash trays. Thirdhand smoke is residual — or leftover — nicotine and other chemicals that...
  • FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Overall cancer death rates in the United States continue to fall, but racial gaps persist, a new report says. Death rates fell between 2010 and 2014 for 11 of the 16 most common cancers in men and for 13 of the most common types in women, including lung, colon, prostate and...