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  • Experts say the trauma and intensity of cancer treatments can cause insomnia. Cognitive behavioral therapy can help.  Researchers say cognitive behavioral therapy is the most effective way to treat insomnia in cancer survivors. They say the intensity and trauma of cancer diagnosis and treatment causes insomnia in up...
  • (Reuters Health) - - As a growing number of people live decades after a cancer diagnosis, doctors and scientists are developing treatment guidelines for survivors. But a U.S. report suggests more work is needed to improve the consistency and quality of survivorship care. It's been more than a decade since the...
  • If your friend, colleague, partner or family member has completed cancer treatment, you probably feel relieved that their treatment is over and was successful. And you probably imagine they’re feeling relieved, too. But cancer is an emotional roller coaster – and it doesn’t come to a screeching halt once treatment...
  • Medical professionals are ramping up programs to help cancer survivors deal with the emotional, physical, and financial aftermath. There are now more than 15 million cancer survivors in the United States.  The number of cancer survivors is growing. And they’re living longer. While advances in diagnosis and treatment...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Female cancer survivors exposed to potentially cardiotoxic treatments rarely develop new congestive heart failure (CHF) during pregnancy, researchers from Canada report. "The low incidence of cardiac complications in women without a prior history of cardiotoxicity was a very interesting...
  • Cardio could be the closest thing to a miracle drug that we have, but doing it shouldn't take a whole day. Instead, the available evidence suggests there's an ideal window for exercises like cycling, swimming, or brisk walking — and it's under an hour. All of these moves raise your heart rate and get you moving and...
  • Starting a new year, which many celebrate by looking ahead, may be a time of special reflection for those who are undergoing or who have finished cancer treatment. If this is you, consider making some New Year’s resolutions for your health and your life post-cancer. Resolutions can help to focus your actions in the...
  • Because he was in such a hurry to get to his granddaughter’s high school graduation, James Riddick did not realize he had forgotten his cane until he reached the bus. “Certain things you get so dependent on, it becomes like part of you,” said Mr. Riddick, 80. On that day, more than a year and a half ago, he stepped up...
  • When you began your cancer treatment, you couldn't wait for the day you'd finish. But now that you've completed your treatment, you aren't sure if you're ready for life after treatment as a cancer survivor. With your treatment completed, you'll likely see your cancer care team less often. Though you, your friends and...
  • (HealthDay News) -- If you're a cancer survivor, you may have mental health issues that affect your emotions, ability to concentrate, behavior and memory. Ten percent of adult cancer survivors feel they have mental health issues, compared with 6 percent of adults without a history of cancer, the U.S. Centers for...
  • But it's not all good news. Cancer has been one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. for years, so it’s understandable that you might be a little freaked out about the disease. But now, there’s some good news on the cancer front: Deaths from the disease are down 26 percent from their peak in 1991. That’s the...
  • (Reuters Health) - Cancer patients may often experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the months after their tumors are diagnosed, and mental health issues can sometimes linger for years, a Malaysian study suggests. Six months after diagnosis, 22% of cancer patients reported symptoms of PTSD in clinical...
  • Your friends and family love you and are worried about you — but they sometimes have strange ways of showing it. Some people withdraw and avoid talking to you. Others smother you and treat you like a child. Many cancer survivors find that one barrier to a smooth transition out of cancer treatment is the reaction they...
  • Q: I’ve had radiation therapy to the chest. Will heart surgery be riskier for me?  A: Radiation therapy to the chest to treat cancer — most often breast cancer or Hodgkin’s lymphoma — can lead to what’s known as radiation heart disease. This condition may develop in cancer survivors 10 or more years after their...
  • If you've lived through a cancer diagnosis and treatment, you've spent months--or possibly years--worrying about your disease. You've done everything you had to do--traveling to one doctor's appointment after another, undergoing scans and biopsies, and putting your body through the rigors of surgery, chemotherapy, or...
  • The attendant walked into the hospital waiting room and called my name. I took a deep breath and hurried through the door. “I’m always surprised when my name is pronounced properly at a doctor’s office,” I said. He chuckled. “You’ve been here before.” “Yes,” I said. “Today are my five-year scans.” “You’re a frequent...
  • Cancer patients may ease fatigue more effectively with exercise and psychotherapy than with medication, a recent study suggests. Researchers examined data from 113 previously published studies involving more than 11,500 cancer patients with fatigue. Patients were randomly assigned to treat their exhaustion with...
  • TUESDAY, Aug. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many young cancer survivors have trouble resuming their social lives. Researchers studied 215 cancer survivors between 14 and 39 years of age who completed questionnaires about their social functioning at four, 12 and 24 months after cancer diagnosis. About 1 in 3 reported low...
  • Feeling a little blue lately? A handful of recent research suggests you're not alone. Thankfully, there may be something — or several things — you can do about it. Researchers have known for decades that certain activities make us feel better, and they're just beginning to understand what happens in the brain to boost...
  • THURSDAY, June 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The number of nonsmoking cancer survivors exposed to secondhand smoke is down significantly in the United States, but it's too soon to breathe easy. A new review of federal data on nearly 700 nonsmoking adult cancer survivors found 15.7 percent reporting exposure to...