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  • (Reuters Health) - When terminally ill Americans receive experimental medicines through so-called "compassionate use" programs, they typically only get these drugs after extensive tests for safety and effectiveness, a U.S. study suggests. "This means that sufficient evidence of safety and effectiveness has been...
  • WEDNESDAY, June 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Men with localized high-risk prostate cancer can slow its spread by using a cancer drug that's already on the market, a new clinical trial shows. The targeted drug enzalutamide (Xtandi) reduced by 71 percent these men's risk of either dying from their prostate cancer or...
  • When Ben Pfeiffer was diagnosed with prostate cancer in April, his urologist noted in the biopsy report that he was leaning toward recommending that Pfeiffer have his prostate surgically removed. But Pfeiffer, 58, a married construction supervisor from Las Vegas with two grown daughters, said his wife insisted that he...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Escalating the radiation dose in men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer improves biochemical control but not overall survival, researchers say. Dr. Jeff Michalski of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri and colleagues studied 1,499 patients from 104...
  • (Reuters Health) - Doctors who don't have palliative care training are more likely to recommend aggressive surgery for patients with life-limiting diseases, a study suggests. Researchers surveyed 102 surgeons, oncologists, intensive care specialists, and palliative care doctors near Sacramento, California, asking how...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, the automated-bone-scan index (aBSI) is significantly associated with survival, according to a secondary analysis of data from a clinical trial. As Dr. Andrew J. Armstrong told Reuters Health by email, "In this study, we have...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The optimal treatment for prostate cancer with Gleason score (GS) 9-10 appears to be a combination of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), brachytherapy (BT) and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), according to a retrospective database study. "I would like to underscore that these patients...
  • Harvard Health Blog If you are like me, when you get the flu you head straight to the pharmacy and grab the most powerful over-the-counter medicine you can find. But is that really the best approach? After all, your condition, symptoms and reaction to the virus may be quite different from someone else's, so why use...
  • (Reuters Health) - Men with prostate cancer who get the gland removed may be just as likely to suffer after-effects like erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence with robotic surgery as with other operations, a UK study suggests. Researchers examined data on men with localized prostate cancer who had an operation...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Following prostatectomy, patients with prostate cancer who have adverse pathological features may benefit most from adjuvant radiotherapy, according to a multicenter cohort study. As Dr. Jason A. Efstathiou told Reuters Health by email, "When surgery has probably failed to cure a patient,...
  • Herbal products and prescription drugs aren’t always a good mix. That’s the conclusion of a new study that sheds more light on which herbal remedies should send up a red flag for people on certain drugs. In addition to dangerous side effects, herbal products can impact the efficacy of the drugs, researchers said....
  • Overview Prostatectomy includes a number of surgical procedures to remove part or all of the prostate gland. The prostate gland is situated in the male pelvis, below the urinary bladder. It surrounds the urethra, which carries urine from the bladder to the penis. Prostatectomy can be performed in several ways,...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Young female cancer survivors face daunting decisions about whether to undergo fertility-preservation procedures, and they need better information and support, researchers say. "When a young woman is diagnosed with cancer, a whirlwind of tests, doctor visits, and procedures follows. The...
  • Immunotherapy is revolutionizing the way doctors treat cancer. But it doesn’t work for everyone or for every type of cancer. What makes it a lifesaver for some people and completely ineffective for others? It all depends on the cancer — and on other factors that researchers are still trying to figure out. How does...
  • THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Men with low-risk prostate cancer report a good quality of life after choosing active surveillance as a treatment for their disease, a new study finds. Active surveillance for prostate cancer means a man chooses not to have surgery, radiation or chemotherapy, but instead...
  • If a miracle cure existed that would cure cancer or autism, it’d be tempting to seek it out. The Genesis II Church of Health and Healing claims to offer that “miracle cure” for cancer, autism, and more. But it turns out the “miracle” remedy, which the church refers to as MMS (Miracle Mineral Solution), is a form of...
  • Some of the most exciting advancements in cancer treatment involve biologic therapies. Made with living organisms, biologics prompt the immune system to kill cancer cells. Biosimilars are similar versions of biologics already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA approved the first...
  • The FDA just approved a version of Avastin, a blockbuster chemotherapy made by Genentech that brought in $6.7 billion in sales in 2016.  The newly approved drug, made by Amgen, will go by the marketed name Mvasi. It's a type of medication called a "biosimilar."  Biosimilars are a bit more complicated than your average...
  • LONDON (Reuters) - Cancer patients with high levels of good gut bacteria appear more likely to respond to immunotherapy, potentially opening up a new way to optimize the use of modern medicines that are highly effective but only work in some people. The finding, reported in two scientific papers on Thursday, suggests...
  • There could be much to learn from the field of infectious diseases when it comes to the treatment of cancer. That is the perspective of a group of scientists from the University of California, Berkeley, in an article published in Science Immunology. The researchers suggest that cancer could be thought of as a chronic...