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  • Your browser does not support HTML5 video. 9 ways to clear the fog of cancer treatment Cancer treatment and stress can affect your thinking. Try these tips for refocusing when you're foggy or forgetful. Make lists. Movies to see, to-do lists, people's names: Details can stump you during treatment. Get enough sleep....
  • Your browser does not support HTML5 video. Tips for taming cancer stress Make a list of stressors. Let go of some, find support for others. Put your hand over your heart. Researchers say this simple, soothing action has a calming effect. Listen to music. Your favorite tunes can lower pain levels, especially...
  • Experts say cancer survivors, as well as their spouses and partners, will experience “job lock,” where they continue at their workplace to maintain their current health insurance. Getty Images Researchers say 20 percent of cancer survivors have “job lock,” where they stay in jobs mainly to keep their health insurance...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Although palliative care may be tough to provide during the pandemic, specialists are finding new ways to help their patients, according to a new report. Patients with advanced cancer, in particular, may be more vulnerable to potential COVID-19 exposure, which requires a creative approach...
  • Overview Bone metastasis occurs when cancer cells spread from their original site to a bone. Nearly all types of cancer can spread (metastasize) to the bones. But some types of cancer are particularly likely to spread to bone, including breast cancer and prostate cancer. Bone metastasis can occur in any bone but more...
  • Your cancer is back, and so are the shock and fear that came with your first diagnosis. The uncertainties are back, too, and you wonder about more cancer treatment and about your future. The distress you feel is normal — some say the second cancer diagnosis can be more distressing than the first. What is a cancer...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Group-based acceptance-and-commitment therapy (ACT) reduces fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) in breast-cancer survivors, according to results of a pilot study. "Most interesting was the superiority of ACT over both survivorship education and enhanced usual care in reducing fear of recurrence...
  • Cancer can be confusing and hard to understand. Sometimes we can’t picture what exactly is happening inside our own body, especially when it can affect any part. And if you mix in blood cancer, it can be even trickier to understand. Some types of cancer have similarities and this is especially true of leukemia and...
  • You might not think about how important your hair is until you face losing it. And if you have cancer and are about to undergo chemotherapy, the chance of hair loss is very real. Both men and women report hair loss as one of the side effects they fear most after being diagnosed with cancer. For many, hair loss is a...
  • By Liz Seegert, Next Avenue Contributor Medicine has made remarkable progress in battling many diseases that were once a certain death sentence. Conditions like HIV, heart disease and many types of cancer are now treated as chronic conditions — with patients living 20 or 30 years, or longer, after diagnosis. However,...
  • Your browser does not support HTML5 video. Staying connected, online or in real time, doesn't just feel good, it plays a role in health outcomes and survival rates. Use social media to connect. Find supportive communities even when you're not feeling well. Plan simple connections close to home. Using your energy...
  • In November 2019, the first case of novel coronavirus infection was detected in a country 7000 miles away from the United States. Over the following months, the number of cases and deaths rose dramatically, peaking at ~81,000. Today, four months after the world’s first known COVID-19 infection, the U.S. has surpassed...
  • This article was originally published on March 17, 2020. It was updated on April 4, 2020, to reflect new information about this rapidly evolving situation. As events get rescheduled for the fall, schools remain closed and communities are urged to practice social distancing and abide by stay-at-home orders in light of...
  • A biopsy is a procedure to remove a piece of tissue or a sample of cells from your body so that it can be analyzed in a laboratory. If you're experiencing certain signs and symptoms or if your doctor has identified an area of concern, you may undergo a biopsy to determine whether you have cancer or some other...
  • The new procedure uses sound waves that target, heat, and destroy problematic prostate tissue. Getty Images Researchers have unveiled a new technique using ultrasound to treat prostate cancer. The procedure known as TULSA doesn’t involve surgery and has minimal side effects. The technique is already available for...
  • (Reuters Health) - Patients undergoing major cancer surgery might reduce their risk of postoperative pneumonia by seeing a dentist beforehand, a study from Japan suggests. "Oral care is one option for preventing postoperative pneumonia as postoperative pneumonia can be precipitated by aspiration of oral and pharyngeal...
  • It doesn’t seem fair. Childhood should be filled with laughter, games and play. Being a kid shouldn’t include things like surgery and chemotherapy. But unfortunately, childhood cancer is the reality that many families face. Sadness, denial, grief and anger wash over parents when they learn the news of a child...
  • (Reuters Health) - Patients with breast cancer who use supplements during chemotherapy may be at an increased risk of recurrence and death, a new study suggests. Use of dietary supplements that boost levels of antioxidants, iron, vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids appeared to lower the effectiveness of chemotherapy,...
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - For overall survival, the optimal timing of colon-cancer definitive resection appears to be several weeks after the time of diagnosis, according to a retrospective study of two databases. "Whenever possible, patients should be optimized prior to surgery," Dr. Robert J. Kucejko of Drexel...
  • Overview During active surveillance for prostate cancer, your doctor closely monitors your prostate cancer for any changes. Active surveillance for prostate cancer is sometimes called expectant management or watchful waiting. No cancer treatment is provided during active surveillance for prostate cancer. This means...